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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
fourchlg the taliban, to try to reshape the environment there, and to try to maneuver the various players in the region towards negotiated outcome because there was no military outcome. that seems not to have gone well. in the absence of that, what is the strategic course? the strategic course is now to minimize american vulnerability in these areas. not walk afrom afghanistan, as has happened in the past. try to give afghanistan some choices, but for security and to try to get away from what i think is the free riding problem where president obama is free riding on security, and not moving governments forward to get other stake holding in the rest of the country. i think the president has moved that security blanket in part to change the dynamic in the region. he is also committed to rebalancing attention on asia, and he is taking military forces out should they be needed for iran and other matters. this is a very shrewd, smart move that i think the wlous is making. >> now, what we're seeing here, as well, is that they -- we just -- we're told that there's a two-minute warning. they do n
enough people. and how do we get them in an environment in which nobody wants to serve and we have a hard time making national security decisions about what to do and make them honestly and intelligently. we've had a pretty lousy record of making intelligent decisions about national security in the last few years. >> i just think it's fascinating that we're now in a position where we need to be transitioning from being a military that is making all of its decisions about dwell time and how much time you got between deployments and who is going to deploy where and when to instead thinking about a mill they're is not at war, that needs to decide what its strength is going to be, its training requirements, its weapons systems are going to be. and the last time we did this really is after vietnam and we've got all these vietnam guys. >> you're absolutely right. if you talk to a guy like marty dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and you get him against the corner and we're inside the cone of silence and he'll tell you honestly what he believes, he will tell you that one of the majo
world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the generals there like general stanley mcchrystal than he has with others. and i talked with pentagon officials yesterday who were saying they weren't sure how these meetings were going to go because you just never know when you're dealing with president karzai what you're going to get. and in fact i even e-mailed a couple days ago the folks i met in afghanistan during previous trips and they were somewhat concerned, as well, saying they weren't exactly sure what karzai was going to say while he was here with president obama because a lot of people in afghanistan especially some of the leaders there still very much want u.s. troops because they're fully aware that the afghan forces are not going to be ready by the end of next year. >> absol
and your observations on that nexus between the environment and the economy, and then i want to come to gayle, switching gears entirely, and going back to the state park concept you mentioned in your opening remark, so, frank? >> thank you, lynn. we did travel to brazil together. i've never seen a more energetic herder than lynn. [laughter] she recognizedded most of the things we saw, including some i think you have never seen before. it's important to know why we went to brazil and what that tells us about the subject we are talking about today. we went there because we wanted to find out how brazil was doing in its effort to reduce the deep forrestation that was taking place in the amazon. is the first thing we did once we got there was go to a slaughter house. we looked at each other and said, we didn't sign up for that. what's that have to do with deforestation? turns out brazil's effort to reduce deforestization was to enact a law that required certain land owners, many land owners, to take a certain part of their land, a fraction of their land and keep that in natural state, me
problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
. >> do you think there is a way we can do corporate reform in this environment? >> is extremely difficult but i think one really positive thing that came out of this fiscal debates this time is that for the first time in a long time, the business community unified around a concept of getting our deficit under control. they were not as worried about their individual tax breaks that might go as a result of having some reform. i hope that mood continues. that was a one group does not argue over one other or about accelerated depreciation and so forth. i am more hopeful that a more unified view from the business community is possible this time. >> i want to say one thing -- i'm not fully knowledgeable about this. i was at a meeting earlier today we're in noted tax expert said you cannot do corporate reform and not to individual reform because when we change the parameters, a whole lot of entities shifted from c corporations to other forms that were taxed on the individual side. if you lower rates on the corporate tax and get away with some of the preferences for oil and gas and various things
things. carbon tax anything dealing with the environment, climate change, i would be surprised. if he's going to cause the freak out with the executive order of gun control, that takes up so much oxygen, and you can only have so many of those freaks outs, and he can't do it seven or eight times. >> john: i think america has seen enough g.o.p. freak outs. >> they want to do something about climate change, but it's only when the economy is humming well when we ask companies to cut down on emissions. but right now there is no room to maneuver on this at all. >> john: getting the cab cabinet nominees confirmed, gun control where is he the most vulnerable on? >> i think they're doing this small incremental attack him on everything trying to bog him down on the simplest things which cabinet nominees used to be automatic. they decided well, we're going to attack, attack, attack, and make him use up capital. i don't think they have a grand strategy. i don't think they're looking down the road six, eight months, this is where we'll set our trap. they made it clear from 2009 we'll obstruct ever
. it costs a lot of money. in this case it is also costing the environment. >>steve: thanks for the cheery report. >> i was at the redskins game so i'm in a bad news. i'm hosting varney together. we're going to have grover norquist. we're going to give him a heart time because i say this fiscal cliff might have been his waterloo. >>steve: in a couple of minutes, the former marine who wrote a scathing letter to dianne feinstein will join us live. >>gretchen: matt damon wants us to believe that fracking is bad in his movie but a secret report says no fracking way. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment informati
will be endorsing individual groups too early that enhances this environment of uncertainty in afghanistan where we do need actually a clear movement. we don't have political party notice afghanistan so therefore it's important to know who are some of the front-runners but president karzai may not like to see an individual emerging because it will make him less relevant. >> of course washington's relations with president karzai have been bumpy many times along the way. >> yes. >> so is there a clear sense, a belief that he will step down in some sense of what comes next. >> i think i would agree again with the ambassador that even though he mentioned this, the jury is still out as to what will happen. afghanistan is an unpredictable place as i found out and many would agree. however it would really help democratic institution building in afghanistan and the democratic process if he did follow through with this commitment et cetera's just made in front of the president of the united states an american public here in the united states. he said it before in afghanistan and actually left office and let
, first the committee on the environment and pickup works. and then, more importantly the committee on finance. you know, i could maybe tell the governor some more stories about how i pushed through the biggest tax increase in history 20 years ago, maybe entertain him with some of the funny stuff that happened on the senate floor when the republicans were not half as crazy as they are now. and then beg the governor to appoint me as john kerry's successor in the senate. my point, basically, experience matters. and in the overnight polling, america spoke, spoke clearly in favor of a senator o'donnell. in a poll we conducted on our website i now have a huge lead. a huge lead over anyone else to be appointed senator from massachusetts. 40% want barney frank. only 4% want oscar winner and current oscar contender ben affleck to take time off from living the dream to cast some votes in the senate for a couple of months. and as i stared at the polling today, 51% supported me. as i stared at those results, refreshing the refresh button, as the hundreds of votes were cast i reached for the ph
to answer to his royal grandchild about the state of the environment. >> i'm going to be confronted by my future grandchild. why didn't you do something? so clearly now there is a -- we'll have a grandchild, it makes it even more obvious. to try and make sure we have -- leave them something that isn't a totally poisoned chalice. >> prince charles revealed he does worry about his son harry serving in afghanistan. >>> forking over some serious dough for wonder bread. cnbc's mandy drury is here with what's moving your money. reports two bidders have emerged in the hostess bankruptcy talks to buy the bread part of the business. >> that's right. flowers foods and grupo. two names thrown around before reportedly in discussions to acquire pieces of the bread business as hostess is basically selling off assets now in a bankruptcy court auction which could be as soon as this week. there are reports of other interested parties. those two are supposedly the opening bidders. as for how much they might have to fork over, you've got the bread business and it's got lots of brands. things like wonder bre
the environment. >> reporter: environmentalists say this airport sits on top of an aquifer that supplies the town and the rest of long island with its drinking water. presumably what is above-ground affects what is below ground. the water comes below ground. if vehicles are sitting above it they could be leaking things like oil or gas and they are concerned it will taint what comes out of the taps. >> road runnoff is the third largest contributor to ground pollution on long island. these people have gone to the center of the island's most pristine drinking water supply and put some 35,000 wrecked vehicles. a truly bad idea. >> reporter: well the town says there are 15,000, not 35 thousand cars. they're parked on pavement. they're all inspected every day and they will all be gone in three to six months, martha. martha: interesting story. thanks so much, rick. bill: now to a murder mystery after a lottery winner is found dead right after winning the jackpot. what happened there? martha: that is a strange story. the gun control fight is heating up while consumers what? customers didn't like it. so w
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
difficult to get a loan than five or seven years ago. everybody know that is the lending environment was too loose. anybody could walk in and you didn't have to prove income and you could probably get it with no down payment. that department make sense. huh no skin in the game and so many loans went bad. the pendulum has swung and the lenders are worried that if they make loans now that they have financial liability. the rule is the ability to repay. if the borrower does not demonstrate the ability o ability to repay, the loan goes bad and the lender can be charged. >> this protects the lender as well. >> exactly. if they use these new rules that everybody will, it will be designated a qualified borrower. qualified borrowers are like preapproved by fannie mae and we will take loan and if it goes bad, it's our fault, not yours. >> how does it affect the howing market? >> not good. a lot of the market depends on first time home buyers. these are people who most need help. they tend not to have much in the way of a down payment and tend not to have the best credit in the world. they are just ge
in our urban environments and yes, under these circumstances where somebody goes in and shoots up a movie theater or shoots up a school. let's take the steps that make the most sense today. i had a great conversation yesterday with vice president biden. and i know he is preparing his recommendations to the president. and i don't want to get into the details of the discussion, but he's got this down pretty well. he understands what we need to do to make it less likely that these things are going to happen in our cities and towns and these mass murders could be limited at least going into the future if some common-sense things are taken. the magazine thing is very big. >> wes. >> and it seems like a large part of the issue as well is there are actually laws that are sitting on the becomes, laws that are supposed to be enforced by atf and federal authorities that they have not had the capacity to be able to enforce. where does that fall into the larger conversation as well, and what can states and municipalities do to actually enforce what's there right now, but we have been woefully insuffi
are able to be creative, often work in quiet environments, and physical demands are low. medical records technician has the third place spot. pay is just over 30- thousand, but it's a growing profession. jeweler comes in fourth. rounding out the top five- medical lab technician. also on the list of low stress jobs. audiologists, dietitians, hair stylists, librarians and a very unlikely one - a drill press operator. i'm alison kosik in new york. >> pam: in sports. after finally ending the player lockout. the n-h-l gets ready for a shortened season . and it's the 49ers and packers. again. in the n'f'l's divisional playoffs saturday at candlestick. gary's next with all the sports >> pam: gary radnich? >> the bigger question is can aaron rogers. he is talking about saturday's game. >> one of the best things we did was to score points. and, who were on at that date, mentally, physically. we're preparing to play a great football game. >> going back to the west coast, there are a lot of people in the area. and a lot of cheese tends coming down to the game. >> he is capable of making every throw
. do it again. do it again. do it again. >> i'm focused with professionals in a controlled environment. to my surprise, lou describes this as a the pussy cat of weapons. >> what'd you think about shooting that? >> reporter: i have to agree with lou, it's a very gentle gun. >> it is. >> reporter: my city has lots of police and lots of gun laws. as a civilian, i can't carry a firearm here. lou, a former cop, can, and never leaves home without one. his concern -- >> they're legislating laws that do not impact the criminal element. in other words, the only people that obey the law are law-abiding citizens. >> reporter: the aurora movie theater shooter used three firearms, one a shotgun similar to this. a single cartridge, multiple pellets, maximum damage. >> you can smell the powder, too. >> absolutely. >> reporter: i'm torn between fascination and fear. i understand self-protection and competitive sport but gun crime is a reality in my city. >> i look at people as being evil, you know? i've never seen a gun jump up on its own and shoot someone. >> reporter: so i change my scenario. if i l
with a cascading flood of cuts. and for that kind of an environment, you don't need somebody who is an outsider who doesn't have the practical experience and who's nakedly ambitious for the job. >> tom cotton is a republican congressman, veteran of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. thank you for coming in. >> thank you, wolf. good to be here with you. >> why do you oppose the nomination of chuck hagel to be defense secretary? >> wolf, the president said that chuck hagel is the leader our troops deserve. i couldn't disagree any more strongly. our troops deserve much better than a man who voted to send them to war when it was popular and then abandon those very troops when it was unpopular. i would know, wolf. i was one of those troops. i returned from iraq in november 2006 with my platoon from the 101st airborne just as chuck hagel was writing that we couldn't achieve victory in iraq, that time for more troops had passed and it was time to withdraw. he just didn't oppose the surge, wolf. he called it the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country's history since vietnam. he delayed emerge
. [video clip] >> we are all products of our experience and environment. i have been tempered by the experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy and military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose in power. no question much of the questioning i have done about iraq and was tempered by the experience in vietnam. whenever i will ever do in my life -- whatever i will do in my life, those experiences shaped me, just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. it makes you less inclined to jump into war. it is easy to get into war, not very easy to get out, as evidenced by the johnson tapes. you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important, especially in the complicated world we live in today. i think something else is important here and a lesson we learned from vietnam. what is going to be very important for america is not to isolate ourselves in the wo
beads on a minisubs and body washes they could be bad for the environment. the problem is those tiny beads don't descend a great and end up going down the drain and can end up in the ocean where they can be swallowed by marine life. now you know lever the company that makes them selves, gasoline and other popular skin-care products once remove my grubbies from its products by 2015. unilever says it's looking for an alternative to the mall plastic might grow beets.my grow beads. droid dna augmentation initiated. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. >> looking at a hot spot mt. view a disabled big rig on 1 01 in the northbound direction has been blocking one of the right-hand lanes and taking a long time to clear. it is now starting to have ripple effects. affected arrive on 1 01 northbound and traffic was little lighter than it normally would have been which is why we don't have a bigger
or attempts on his life three times and operates in a very difficult political environment and has an insurgency going. so i think if you put all of those factors in play, suddenly you get a better measure of the kind of what he has facing him. i'm not saying that president karzai is a perfect leader. but what i'm saying is we should try to understand that context and i think it can allow us to deal better with a leader like him? >> in your book you write this about the afghan president. hamid karzai was a man of strong emotions and loyalties rubbed raw sometimes to cynicism by long years and slowed to trust but chited to relationships. you spent a lot of travel time with him. bottom line, is he doing what he needs to do? >> well, i'm not on the ground to junl the current activities but i think he's doing what he thinks he has to do, and that is navigate a western coalition that is very skeptical of the mission and desirous of pulling out, dealing with a taliban insurgency and then internal politics. so i think if you really look at his challenge, he's walking a tight rope in a sti
he kind of gets away with it. one area he has credibility is on the environment. many years ago before it was a mainstream subject, he was championing protecting the rain forest and wildlife. he was talking about that today on british tv and he made a few comments. he says since he found out he's going to become a grandfather, the duchess of cambridge is obviously pregnant, his opinions about conservation have actually become much stronger. >> have gone on for years about importance of thinking, about the long term, in relation to environmental damage, climate change, everything else. because we don't really in a sense airline world want to hand on an increasingly dysfunctional world to our grandchildren. and i don't want to be confronted by my future grandchild say, why didn't you do something. so clearly, now that there's a -- we'll have a grandchild, obviously, it makes it even more obvious, you know, to try and make sure we have them, leave them something that isn't a totally poisoned -- >> this is something, wolf, he spoke about in the past. he thinks it's the greatest thre
policy, for example. they've done so many things by executive order on the environment that are radical shifts from where most americans are. i don't see why anyone would dismiss that the kind of extreme measures that people have contemplated in the past and what's most dangerous is the way that they couch their rhetoric in what seems to be moderation. right now they're talking about gun safety instead of gun control. and when they harp about assault weapons or ammunition, what they're really talking about, and we have had this kind of cantor before from the gun grabbers is talking about the kind of hand guns that ordinary americans use to protect themselves. >> steve: sure. exactly. you know, what they're looking at right now, background checks and things like that, and the fact that they want to have no gun zones around schools, neither one of those would have probably stopped the tragedy in sandy hook because the guns did not belong to the shooter. it was already a no gun zone at that school. we've got a sound bite for everybody to listen to. here is bill clinton in las vegas at the
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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